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Chinese Almond Cookies

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Last Updated on January 14, 2022 by Lisa Johnson

These light and flaky Chinese Almond Cookies have a subtle almond flavor and taste just like the ones you find in your favorite Chinese restaurant!

Ten Chinese Almond Cookies stacked on a white plate.

I used to love getting Chinese take-out when I was growing up, those pink spareribs (Char Siu) were my favorite!! Getting an almond cookie out of the glass jar on the counter was also pretty exciting.

I have not seen almond cookies in any restaurant since I left California, so I decided to recreate my own!

Almond Cookies on a plate © COOKING WITH CURLS

Images updated on January 14, 2022

📋What you will need

Chinese Almond Cookies ingredients in small bowls.
  • Lard or shortening are traditionally used to make these light cookies, I have used both and they are equally delicious.
  • A combination of granulated and brown sugars add sweetness without being overpowering, and an egg binds the cookie dough together with the all-purpose flour, salt, and baking powder.
  • Almond flavoring gives these cookies a subtle flavor and is expected given the fact that they are topped with a blanched almond.
  • An egg yolk mixed with water gives them a nice sheen and added color.

Be sure to check out the detailed printable recipe card below

Nine whole and one broken almond cookies with crumbs and almond scattered around.

♐ These cookies are dessert for the Sagittarius meal which also includes:  Lychee Martini, Paper Wrapped Chicken, Chicken Chow Mein and Egg Foo Young for breakfast.

👩🏻‍🍳 How to make Chinese Almond Cookies

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together the lard (or shortening) and sugars until fluffy. Add the egg and almond extract, and beat until well blended.

Sugar, lard, eggs, and almond flavor beaten together in a large bowl.

Sift flour, salt, and baking powder into the sugar mixture. Mix until combined.

Flour, salt, and baking powder in a sifter over the sugar mixture.

Roll one tablespoon of dough into a ball, or use a small cookie scoop. Place balls 2-inches apart on a prepared baking sheet.

Press down with the bottom of a glass to form a 2-inch round cookies.

Twelve flattened almond cookies on a parchment lined baking sheet.

Press one almond into the center of each cookie.

Whisk egg yolk and water together in a small bowl. Brush mixture over top of each cookie.

Six flattened cookies topped with a blanched almond and egg wash on parchment paper.

Bake until lightly browned, 10 to 12 minutes.

Baked almond cookies on a parchment lined baking sheet.

Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Nineteen Chinese almond cookies on a wire cooling rack over a dish towel with a bowl of raw almonds in the upper left corner.

I seem to remember the Almond Cookies from my early days being orange? Does anyone else remember that? Oh well, these are quite delicious…..orange or not!

📌 Recipe Notes & Tips

  • The second image is the original from nine years ago, and I used regular sugars to create them.
  • The new images were made using Swerve (erythritol sweetener) and they are darker and heavier than the originals. I really wanted to try them, but I do not eat sugar so I gave it a try, lol.
  • Using an organic egg yolk will give the tops of the cookies a more traditional “orange” tint than regular store-brand eggs will.
  • Store cookies in an airtight container for 3 to 4 days, or in the freezer for up to a month.

🥣 Tools used to create this recipe

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🥡 More Chinese Takeout Recipes

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Enjoy!!

Ten Chinese Almond Cookies stacked on a white plate.

Almond Cookies

These traditional Chinese Almond Cookies are just like the ones you find in a Chinese restaurant. They are light and flaky with a subtle almond flavor!
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Print Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Chinese
Keyword: Chinese restaurant almond cookies
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 27 minutes
Servings: 24 Servings
Calories: 45kcal
Author: Lisa Johnson

Ingredients

  • 0.5 cup lard or Crisco shortening
  • .25 cup granulated sugar
  • 0.13 cup brown sugar 1/8th cup
  • 1 large egg
  • 0.5 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1.13 cup all-purpose flour
  • 0.06 teaspoon salt 1/16th teaspoon
  • .75 teaspoons baking powder
  • 24 whole blanched almonds
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon water

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.
  • In a large bowl, beat together the lard (or shortening) and sugars until fluffy. Add the egg and almond extract, and beat until well blended.
  • Sift flour, salt, and baking powder into the sugar mixture. Mix until combined.
  • Roll one tablespoon of dough into a ball, or use a small cookie scoop. Place balls 2-inches apart on prepared baking sheets.
  • Press down with the bottom of a glass to form a 2-inch round cookies. Tip – place a piece of parchment paper between the cookie dough and glass to keep it from sticking.
  • Press one almond into the center of each cookie.
  • Whisk egg yolk and water together in a small bowl. Brush mixture over top of each cookie.
  • Bake until lightly browned, 10 – 12 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Notes

  • Using an organic egg yolk will give the tops of the cookies a more traditional “orange” tint than regular store-brand eggs will.
  • Store cookies in an airtight container for 3 to 4 days, or in the freezer for up to a month.

Nutrition

Calories: 45kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 16mg | Sodium: 10mg | Potassium: 31mg | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 60IU | Vitamin C: 0.2mg | Calcium: 14mg | Iron: 0.4mg

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10 Comments

  1. Lisa, these cookies look so good and I love almond! I DO remember the cookies being orange – we probably are better off not knowing why! 😉 Thanks for sharing the recipe – pinning! Have a great Thursday!

  2. I absolutely love almond cookies. Thank you for linking to the In and Out of the Kitchen Link Party. I look forward to seeing you next week.

  3. I never realized that Chinese make almond cookies… they are such a big part of Italian dessert tradition… interesting connection, you know the Marco Polo pasta thing etc..

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