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Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon

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A food blogger walks into a grocery store where she is greeted by a huge display of fresh asparagus, so it goes into the cart. She continues through the produce department looking for more inspiration and comes across a bag of edamame, so it also goes into the cart. Next to go into the cart are fresh ginger, wild-caught salmon, and soba noodles. Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon for dinner she exclaimed!!

This Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon is served on a bed of soba noodles that have been tossed with asparagus and edamame for a deliciously simple meal any night of the week! © COOKING WITH CURLS

Don’t you wish figuring out what to have for dinner was always that easy? 😉 I actually knew that I wanted to make Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon for dinner, I just wasn’t exactly sure what I was going to serve it with. I am getting bored with rice and zucchini. It was time to change things up!!

Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon served on a bed of soba noodles, asparagus, and edamame © COOKING WITH CURLS

What is Miso?

Miso is a thick paste used for sauces and spreads, pickling vegetables or meats, and mixing with dashi soup stock to serve as miso soup in traditional and modern Japanese cooking. It is created by fermenting soybeans with salt and koji, sometimes rice, barley, or other ingredients are used. Miso is high in protein and rich in vitamins and minerals.

Miso is typically salty, but its flavors and aroma vary depending on the ingredients and fermentation process.

We will be using Shiromiso or “white miso” today.

How do you make Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon?

Mix the miso, honey, mirin, sake, and ginger together in a baking dish…..

A white baking dish with the miso-ginger glaze for the salmon © COOKING WITH CURLS

Place the salmon flesh side down in the baking dish…..

Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon marinating in a white baking dish © COOKING WITH CURLS

Leave on the counter to marinate for 30 minutes, turning occasionally. Or cover and place in the refrigerator over night.

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil, then the salmon fillets skin side down…..

Four Salmon fillets sizzling in a cast iron skillet © COOKING WITH CURLS

Brush with marinade and cook until the flesh turns opaque almost half way up the side, 3 to 4 minutes. Flip the salmon over and cook for an additional 3 to 4 minutes until the salmon is cooked through. Be careful not to over cook!

Flip the salmon over and cook on the other side © COOKING WITH CURLS

Why yes, that is burnt! In a perfect world I would have someone here to take the pictures while I keep an eye on the temperature of the pan, LOL Don’t panic, keep going…I have a plan. 😉

Remove the salmon fillets from the pan. Add the remaining marinade and the vegetable stock…..

Marinade simmering in the cast iron skillet © COOKING WITH CURLS

Yours will be lighter in color if you have not burned the skin to the bottom of the pan! 😉

Bring marinade to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes to kill any bacteria that may or may not exist.

For the Soba Noodles with Asparagus and Edamame:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the asparagus and cook for 3 to 4 minutes…..

Asparagus in boiling water © COOKING WITH CURLS

Remove from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water for one minute to stop the cooking process….

Asparagus in a bowl of ice water © COOKING WITH CURLS

Add the edamame to the boiling water and cook for 3 minutes, or according to the package directions…..

Edamame cooking in boiling water © COOKING WITH CURLS

Remove from the water and place in a large bowl.

Add the soba noodles to the boiling water and cook for 5 minutes, or according to the package directions…..

Soba noodles cooking in boiling water © COOKING WITH CURLS

Drain the noodles and add them to the bowl with the asparagus and edamame. Toss to combine…..

Toss the soba noodles with the asparagus and edamame in a large bowl with tongs © COOKING WITH CURLS

Serve a salmon fillet on top of a bed of soba noodles drizzled with the marinade and garnished with sesame seeds and green onions…..

Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon served on a bed of soba noodles, asparagus, and edamame is a deliciously simple meal any night of the week! © COOKING WITH CURLS

for a deliciously simple meal any night of the week!

Notes: {contains affiliate links}

This is what white miso looks like…..

A container of Organic White Miso © COOKING WITH CURLS

  • Miso can be found in the refrigerated section at your local Asian market or online at Amazon.
  • I broke the tough ends off of the asparagus then cut them in half…..

Asparagus cut into pieces © COOKING WITH CURLS

  • Fresh edamame can be found in the produce section at most grocery stores, or frozen in the frozen vegetable aisle.
  • If you do not like ginger simply leave it out. If you are not sure about the ginger, start with 1/2 a Tablespoon.
  • Mirin is a Japanese condiment. It is a type of rice wine similar to sake, but with a lower alcohol content and higher sugar content.
  • If you cannot find Mirin, substitute white wine.
  • Sake is a Japanese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice. Substitute dry vermouth if you do not have sake.
  • The honey flavor is noticeable in this recipe. If you do not like honey, substitute brown or white sugar, or maple syrup.

I use this handy, dandy Slotted Turner whenever cooking fish, and my favorite Spider Strainer to remove vegetables from boiling water.

My brilliant plan to fix my blackened salmon? I pulled the skin off before serving. 😉

What else can I make with Miso?

Enjoy!!

Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon laying on a bed of soba noodles, asparagus and beans.

Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon

This Miso-Ginger Glazed Salmon is served on a bed of soba noodles that have been tossed with asparagus and edamame for a deliciously simple meal any night of the week!
5 from 1 vote
Print Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Japanese
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Calories: 443kcal
Author: Lisa Johnson

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons white miso
  • 3 Tablespoons honey (sugar or maple syrup)
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh, grated ginger root
  • 1 Tablespoon mirin
  • 1 Tablespoon sake
  • 1 Tablespoon grape seed or canola oil
  • 1 pound wild-caught salmon (4 fillets)
  • ¼ cup vegetable stock
  • 5 ounces dry soba noodles
  • ½ cup edamame
  • 1 bunch asparagus (trimmed and cut in half)
  • toasted sesame seeds and sliced green onions to garnish

Instructions

  • Mix the miso, honey, mirin, and ginger together in a baking dish.
  • Place the salmon flesh side down in the baking dish. Leave on the counter to marinate for 30 minutes, turning occasionally. Or cover and place in the refrigerator over night.
  • Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil, then the salmon fillets skin side down.
  • Brush with marinade and cook until the flesh turns opaque almost half way up the side, 3 to 4 minutes. Flip the salmon over and cook for an additional 3 to 4 minutes until the salmon is cooked through. Be careful not to over cook!
  • Remove the salmon fillets from the pan. Add the remaining marinade and the vegetable stock. Bring marinade to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes to kill any bacteria that may or may not exist.

FOR THE SOBA NOODLES WITH ASPARAGUS AND EDAMAME

  • Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the asparagus and cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water for one minute to stop the cooking process.
  • Add the edamame to the boiling water and cook for 3 minutes, or according to the package directions. Remove from the water and place in a large bowl.
  • Add the soba noodles to the boiling water and cook for 5 minutes, or according to the package directions. Drain the noodles and add them to the bowl with the asparagus and edamame. Toss to combine.
  • Serve a salmon fillet on top of a bed of soba noodles drizzled with the marinade and garnished with sesame seeds and green onions.

Notes

  • Miso can be found in the refrigerated section at your local Asian market or online at Amazon.
  • Fresh edamame can be found in the produce section at most grocery stores, or frozen in the frozen vegetable aisle.
  • If you do not like ginger simply leave it out. If you are not sure about the ginger, start with 1/2 a Tablespoon.
  • Mirin is a Japanese condiment. It is a type of rice wine similar to sake, but with a lower alcohol content and higher sugar content.
  • If you cannot find Mirin, substitute white wine.
  • Sake is a Japanese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice. Substitute dry vermouth if you do not have sake.
  • The honey flavor is noticeable in this recipe. If you do not like honey, substitute brown or white sugar, or maple syrup.

Nutrition

Calories: 443kcal | Carbohydrates: 51g | Protein: 33g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 62mg | Sodium: 901mg | Potassium: 983mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 17g | Vitamin A: 925IU | Vitamin C: 7.5mg | Calcium: 72mg | Iron: 5.1mg

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